Gaseous Systems

Gaseous System

Inert Gas fire suppression systems

Inert gases such as Nitrogen, Argon and maybe mix of them use as fire suppression systems.

These systems offer effective fire protection with zero environmental impact.

Inert Gases are colorless, odorless, chemically inert, electrically non-conductive agent without any residue after discharge

It works by displacing oxygen and reducing from the normal 21% to a level that will not support combustion.

Commonly, there are four types of inert gas systems using different type or mixing ratio of gases:

  • Nitrogen (N2) (mostly recognized as IG-100)
  • Argon (Ar) (mostly recognized as IG-01)
  • 50% N2 + 50% Ar (mostly recognized as IG-55 or Argonite™)
  • 7.6-8.4% CO2 + 37.2-42.8% Ar + 48.8-55.2% N2 (mostly recognized as IG-541)

When used as a fire-fighting agent, IG’s stored under pressure in a liquid phase in high-pressure storage cylinders containing gas at an internal pressure of 2900 psig (200 bar) or 4350 psig (300 bar).

Cylinder capacities are 80 or 140 Lit.

Feature
  • An inexpensive and easy-to-access agent when refill is necessary.
  • Compatible with various detection and control systems.
  • Wide ranges of proven safe, hazard protection.
Limitation of Use
  • Chemicals that contain their own oxygen supply such as: cellulose nitrate (old movie film) and gunpowder, which are capable of rapid oxidation in the absence of air.
  • Reactive metals such as: Lithium, Sodium, Potassium, Magnesium, Titanium, Uranium, or Plutonium.
  • Spaces with low endurance against positive pressure.


Carbon dioxide (CO2) fire suppression system

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a colorless, odorless, chemically inert, electrically non-conductive agent that approximately 50% heavier than air without any residue after discharge.

It extinguishes fire rapidly by lowering the level of oxygen that supports combustion in a protected area. This mechanism of fire suppression makes CO2 suppression systems highly effective, requiring minimal clean-up.

CO2 suppression systems may utilize the gas through a total flooding approach and also local application.

When used as a fire-fighting agent, CO2 is stored under pressure in a liquid/vapor phase in high-pressure storage cylinders containing CO2 at an internal pressure of 850 psig (58 bar) when stored at an ambient temperature of 70 °F (21 °C).

Feature
  • An inexpensive and easy-to-access agent when refill is necessary.
  • Compatible with various detection and control systems.
  • Wide ranges of proven safe, hazard protection.
Limitation of Use
  • Chemicals that contain their own oxygen supply such as: cellulose nitrate (old movie film) and gunpowder, which are capable of rapid oxidation in the absence of air.
  • Reactive metals such as: Lithium, Sodium, Potassium, Magnesium, Titanium, Uranium, or Plutonium.
  • Metal Hydrides such as: Sodium Hydride, Lithium Hydride, Calcium Hydride, Lithium Aluminum, Hydride, and Sodium Borohydride.
  • Normally occupied spaces.


Halocarbon gaseous fire suppression systems

Fast discharge along with minimum gas requirement against other gaseous agents turn it to first option in selecting gaseous fire suppression systems.

There are two pressure storing range for these systems, which is 25 and 42 bar.

Most famous of the agents who are recognized by standards are as follows:

  • HFC227 ea
  • HFC125
Feature
  • Minimum requirement for hardware.
  • Fast extinguishing time.
Limitation of Use
  • Chemicals that contain their own oxygen supply such as: cellulose nitrate (old movie film) and gunpowder, which are capable of rapid oxidation in the absence of air.
  • Reactive metals such as: Lithium, Sodium, Potassium, Magnesium, Titanium, Uranium, or Plutonium.